Harassment
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SEXUAL HARASSMENT      PEER HARASSMENT

SEXUAL HARASSMENT

Dr. Sandler has been involved with sexual harassment issues since the mid-1970's when the term "sexual harassment" first appeared. She published the first national report on campus sexual harassment in 1979, and under her direction as chair of the now defunct National Advisory Council on Women's Educational Programs, the first federal report on harassment in education was developed. She has written extensively about sexual harassment, has spoken about, and consulted and trained administrators, staff and faculty at numerous educational institutions. She consulted with The Citadel on their new sexual harassment policy and other issues. Sandler is currently writing a book about student-student harassment in middle schools with Harriett Stonehill. She also acts as an expert witness in discrimination and sexual harassment lawsuits.

  
THE FOLLOWING ARTICLES ON SEXUAL HARASSMENT ARE AVAILABLE HERE:

TRENDS IN SEXUAL HARASSMENT -- A brief look at the future.

RESPONDING TO COMPLAINTS: DANGEROUS WORDS -- What not to say when an employee (or student) mentions sexual harassment to a colleague or supervisor.

HOW MEN CAN TELL IF THEIR BEHAVIOR IS SEXUAL HARASSMENT -- A quick checklist to evaluate men's (or anyone else's) behavior.

DEALING WITH COMPUTER HARASSMENT -- The Massacusetts Institute of Technology develops an unusual way for an organization or institution to respond to computer harassment.

DIFFERENCES, ADVANTAGES AND DISADVANTAGES OF INFORMAL AND FORMAL COMPLAINT PROCEDURES -- Which complaints can best be handled in an informal manner?  Which ones are best handled  by using formal procedures?  Who gets to decide?  And what's the difference between these?

HANDLING SEXUAL HARASSMENT WHEN IT HAPPENS TO YOU -- What do you do and what can you say when someone harasses you (or a friend)?  Here are a range of options and strategies, from the Ms. Manners' approach ("I beg your pardon!") to filing a formal complaint.

HOW TO HANDLE A SEXUAL HARASSMENT COMPLAINT: PASSING THE HOT POTATO TO SOMEONE ELSE -- Responding to a sexual harassment complaint is tricky.  Say the wrong thing, and your company or institution, and in some instances you, can be sued.  Worse yet, you haven't helped the person who came to you with the problem.  Here's  the easy guide to what to say and do.

INTERVENING WHEN YOU OBSERVE SEXUAL HARASSMENT OF ONE PERSON BY ANOTHER -- Do you know what to say when you see someone sexually harassing someone else?  Here are some strategies for what to say and do, whether you are a supervisor, a co-worker, or just a passerby.

INVESTIGATING SEXUAL HARASSMENT COMPLAINTS -- A compehensive look at how to conduct an investigation fairly and thoroughly.  Covers issues such as what to do before the investigation begins, what written records to keep, how to interview, how to reach a conclusion, criteria for weighting evidence, and what happens after the investigation.

PEER HARASSMENT

Student-to-student harassment is an explosive emerging issues in colleges and universities, especially since the U.S. Supreme Court in 1999 confirmed that Title IX prohibits such harassment, and that schools can be liable if they allow it to continue.  This first report on the subject is a comprehensive look at the problem including a discussion of what it is, examples of harassment by individuals and groups, harassment of women of color, the role of alcohol and drugs, the role of institutions, and other aspects of the problem.  Also included is a short institutional self-evaluation checklist and more than 75 strategies for institutions to deal with this issue.

  
THE FOLLOWING ARTICLES ON PEER HARASSMENT ARE AVAILABLE HERE:

STUDENT TO STUDENT HARASSMENT:  A BRIEF HISTORY -- Summarizes major events and cases concerning student-to-student harassment.  Includes the date when the words "sexual harassment" were first used.

PEER HARASSMENT: HASSLES FOR WOMEN ON CAMPUS -- This 1988 report was the first national report on campus peer harassment and sadly, it is as timely now as then.  (The legal section has been updated.)   It covers describes peer harassment and why it may occur, and includes over 70 institutional recommendations for prevention, programs, and policies, including a short institutional checklist.  COMING SOON...